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The device detects toxic gas wireless, carrying people

Number of visits: Date:2018-04-27 16:17:39
In the study, scientists molded nanotube / polymer materials on gold electrodes and exposed electrodes to diethyl chlorophosphate
 

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have engineered cheap chemistries from chemically modified carbon nanotubes, allowing smartphones or other wireless devices. Detecting small amounts of toxic emissions.

Using sensors, the team hopes to design low-cost, lightweight RFID tags to protect individual safety and security. Soldiers on the battlefield may wear this tag to quickly detect the presence of chemical weapons such as neutrons or aseptic agents and those working around toxic chemicals that are susceptible to leakage. can also use this card.

Sensors are integrated circuits of carbon nanotubes, which are often highly electrically conductive but are encapsulated in insulating materials to maintain them in high resistance. When exposed to some toxic gases, insulating materials are separated and nanotubes can conduct electricity better. Thus, the signal can be transmitted via smartphone by field communication technology (NFC), which allows devices to transfer data between short distances. These sensors are sensitive enough to detect target gas at nearly 10 parts per million for about five seconds.

 

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have engineered cheap chemistries from chemically modified carbon nanotubes that allow smartphones or other wireless devices to detect Make a small amount of toxic emissions.
Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have engineered cheap chemistries from chemically modified carbon nanotubes that allow smartphones or other wireless devices to detect Make a small amount of toxic emissions.

Nanotube coating

In recent years, GS's laboratory. Timothy Swager, lead researcher, has created a cheap, wireless sensor called a chemical resistance that can detect broken meat and ripen fruit among other products. All are designed with chemically modified carbon nanotubes, so they are able to withstand current changes in contact with the target chemicals.

In this study, the researchers designed the sensor very sensitive to electronically or electronically-tuned chemicals, often toxic and used as chemical weapons. Specifically, the team created a metallic supramolecular polymer, a material made of metal bonded to polymer chains. Polymers act as an insulating layer, wrapping each of the dozens of sensors in single-wall carbon nanotubes, separating them and maintaining a high level of resistance. But, electron-like substances make the polymer separate, allowing carbon nanotubes to merge again, increasing the conductivity.

In the study, scientists molded nanotube / polymer materials on gold electrodes and exposed electrodes to diethyl chlorophosphate, a skin irritant, and reacted similarly to toxic gases. Using a current measuring device, the group observed a conductivity increase of 2,000% after 5 seconds of exposure. The same electrical conductivity was observed in a small amount of other electron-like substances such as thionyl chloride (SOCl 2 ), the same reactant as in the asphyxiants. Significantly lower electrical conductivity in response to conventional volatile organic compounds and exposure to most of the non-target chemicals has increased resistivity.

The creation of a polymer is a delicate balance but important for the design. As a polymer, the material needs to keep the carbon nanotubes separate. But when separated, individual monomers of the material need to interact less so that the nanotubes recombine.

Resistor readable

To build a wireless system, researchers have fabricated an NFC tag that is activated when the resistance is below a certain threshold.

Smartphones transmit short pulses of electromagnetic fields resonantly with NFC tags at radio frequencies, generating a transmission line of information to the device. But, smart phones can not resonate with cards with resistors higher than 1 ohm.

The researchers used nanotube / polymer material for the NFC card antenna. When exposed to SOCl 2 at 10 parts per million for 5 seconds, the resistance of the material was reduced to the extent that the smartphone activated the card to emit sound. Basically, this is the indicator to determine the presence of toxic gas.

According to researchers, this wireless system has the potential to be used to detect leaks in Li-SOCl 2 (lithium thionyl chloride) batteries and can be used in medical devices, fire and military system.

The next step, the team will test the sensor on chemicals directly outside the lab, which is more widely dispersed and harder to detect, especially when it comes to low doses. In the future, the scientists hope to develop mobile applications to more accurately measure the signal strength of NFC tags: Signal differences mean higher or lower concentrations of toxic gases.

NPD-NASATI (Theo Phys)


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